Tag: vikings

You Probably Have Royal Blood: Use an Ancestry DNA Coupon To Check!

You Are Royalty, Even If You Don’t Know it Yet.

Many children dream of growing up to become a prince or princess. As those children grow, they discover their dream is completely unrealistic. They move on, becoming productive, mature members of society, never realizing their dream was more realistic than they thought. Most people in the world have some biological connection to royal families or other influential groups.

ancestry dna coupon codesAncestry DNA Promo Codes Can Help.

Let’s face it: everyone is at least a little curious about the story of their family history. Sure, there are photographs going back a century and perhaps a few heirlooms from before that. But nothing can cut through stories and conjecture quite like a DNA test. If you use an Ancestry DNA coupon code, then you can find out instantly your genetic history going thousands of years. Do you have Viking DNA in you? (if you’re northern European, chances are you have at least a little).

The reason is simply genetics. Every person has two biological parents, who also have two biological parents. Each grandparent has two more parents. This way, the numbers can add up very quickly. You have thirty-two great great great grandparents.

Royal Families Tended To Be Huge.

Making your relationship to royalty more likely is the fact that larger families used to be much more common. Medical treatments weren’t as effective. While some royals failed to produce a heir, like Queen Anne I of Great Britain, others had plenty of children. Christine of Mecklenburg-Güstrow gave birth to twenty-three infants, of which eleven survived childhood, and Henry I of England had over twenty children between his many mistresses. Each of those children had royal blood flowing through their veins.

Studies have shown that a majority of Europeans alive today are related to the royal family. In the book Lines of Succession, Michael MacLagan said all present European monarchs are related to William the Conqueror. Elanor Herman notes most of the royal decedents you could meet on the street were from illegitimate children. These children married nobles because their legitimacy made them undesirable to royal suitors.

If you have royal blood, could you inherit the throne? Technically, yes. In reality, you have no chance. There are too many other people with stronger connections to the throne. Unless a natural disaster happened and all the royal houses died, you wouldn’t be considered.

So, is your royal blood useless? There may be one use for it: DNA matching. When a body was discovered buried under a parking lot, many archaeologists thought it was the body of Richard III of England. The parking lot was a church’s burial ground five hundred years ago. The University of Leicester recruited Richard III’s direct decedents, including carpenter Michael Ibsen and Wendy Dulag of New Zeland, to help them identify the bones. The researchers found what they had been looking for. The mitochondrial DNA was matched to the bones.

Perhaps you may not affect the present day royalty, but you could help uncover the past. There are many other royal bodies waiting to be discovered and identified. You may not end up being a prince or princess, but you could be the person who helped identify one.